Buxton Crescent

Replication of "Cordelova" ceiling panels at the Grade I listed Buxton Crescent. Designed by John Carr of York and built 1780 - 1788 for William Cavendish, 5th Duke of Devonshire

  • Buxton Crescent

    Buxton Crescent

  • Using the ARTEC scanner on site

    Using the ARTEC scanner on site

  • An original panel removed from the ceiling

    An original panel removed from the ceiling

  • Routed modelling board (male mould)

    Routed modelling board (male mould)

  • Silicone rubber (female mould)

    Silicone rubber (female mould)

  • Raw unpainted panel after removal from mould

    Raw unpainted panel after removal from mould

  • Completed replica panel mounted on plasterboard

    Completed replica panel mounted on plasterboard

  • Image of the blue room ceiling before restoration

    Image of the blue room ceiling before restoration

  • Following plaster repair

    Following plaster repair

  • Fitting the new tiles

    Fitting the new tiles

  • Ceiling repainted

    Ceiling repainted

The Crescent is currently undergoing a major programme of restoration, funded in partnership by the Heritage Lottery Fund, Buxton Crescent & Thermal Spa Co. Ltd, the Local Authority and Historic England. Lincoln Conservation have been commissioned to reproduce a number of embossed ceiling panels in the "Blue Room". With approximately half the original panels lost due to failure of the lath & plaster ceiling the challenge was to find a way to record and remanufacture, faithfully following the original design and materials as closely as possible. The panels were produced in the late 19th and early 20th century, initially by Brown of Edinburgh, and then after 1899 by Wall Paper Manufacturers Ltd. Produced by compressing two layers of thick paper and glue between rollers the panels measured 24 inches by 36 inches in a high relief. Produced in a variety of designs collectively referred to as "Cordelova".

A contactless method using an ARTEC EVA 3D scanner was used to record a three dimesional record of one tile to a resolution of 0.1mm. This created a polygon mesh from the point cloud data representing the geometry in line of sight of the scanner. The polygon mesh then embedded a colour signal creating a 3D full colour representation of the scanned panel. The resulting file was then exported to two different CAD packages, creating a precise clean geometry suitable for export to a CNC flatbed router. The router was then used to cut a positive pattern into high density modelling board, faithfully reproducing the contours and dimensions of the original panel.

A corresponding female mould was then cast using addition cure silicon rubber. This flexible mould was used as the master to create faithful copies of the replica panels using paper and glue. A total of 100 tiles were hand made and fitted to the repaired ceiling. All were then painted using blue and white colours matched to the existing, by our team of appointed decorators.